Source 1: https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-scienc

Source 1: https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-858-computer-systems-security-fall-2014/video-lectures/lecture-3-buffer-overflow-exploits-and-defenses/
Total matches: 14 (hide)
Original text: One does not have to instrument every pointer operation if static code analysis can be used to figure out that a particular set of pointer operations is safe (In Jajodia, 2014)
Matched text: ((because Windows basically)) does not have ((you don’t actually)) have to instrument every pointer operation if ((you can use)) static code analysis (()) to figure out ((the)) particular set of pointer operations is safe ((. . .))
Match %: 41.38%
Original text: Initializing all these bounds to 31 allows one to automatically assume that each pointer from an instrumented code is going to have the largest bound possible, 2 raised to 31 for instance
Matched text: ((to do is)) automatically assume that each pointer from ((interpose we get)) an instrumented code ((. . .)) code is going to have the largest bound possible 2 raised to ((the 31))
Match %: 43.40%
Original text: False alarms – a program generates out of bound pointers but fails to dereference it
Matched text: ((the case that)) a program generates out of bound pointers but ((it may try)) to dereference it ((it may))
Match %: 58.33%
Original text: The baggy bounds then flag the creation of the out of bounds pointers if they get beyond half a slot size, that is, if it occurs in the 32-bit solution
Matched text: The baggy bounds ((will)) flag the creation of ((can actually put)) the out of bounds pointers if they get beyond ((actually greater than)) half a slot ((this notion of)) a slot size ((at least)) in the 32-bit solution ((right . . .))
Match %: 39.34%
Original text: =====================1/3======================Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses 1 Name Course Tutor Date Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses Baggy bounds allow axises that are out of bounds, as long as they stay within the specific baggy bounds
Matched text: Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses ((. . .)) Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses ((it will actually)) allow axises that are out of bounds ((if)) they stay within ((that baggy))
Match %: 34.40%
Original text: One of the causes of the failure of a program is that the baggy bounds system could throw a hard synchronous error if one gets beyond half a slot from the edge of that baggy bound
Matched text: ((close up with)) the baggy bounds system ((will actually)) throw a hard synchronous error if ((actually greater than)) half a slot ((beyond 1 2)) a slot from the edge of that baggy ((four bytes beyond)) that baggy bound ((. . .))
Match %: 31.23%
Original text: When baggy bounds initialize the bounds tables, they set all entries to be a value of 31
Matched text: ((baggy bounds initializes)) the bounds tables they set all ((this is going)) to be a ((bit tricky))
Match %: 31.34%
Original text: A high order bid is set on the pointer so as to prevent one from trying to subsequently dereference the program which will cause a hard fault at that point
Matched text: ((it’s going to)) cause a hard fault at that point ((. . .))
Match %: 15.66%
Original text: CPU overhead – it is used for doing all of the pointer instrumentation
Matched text: ((CPU overhead of)) doing all of the pointer instrumentation ((right . . .))
Match %: 40.00%
Original text: =====================2/3======================Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses 2 a
Matched text: Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses ((Lecture 3))
Match %: 60.00%
Original text: The bounds table has a slot size that allows one to control how big the bounds table is although one may end up using non-trivial memory for the same
Matched text: ((And so the)) bounds table has ((this notion of)) a slot size ((which allows you)) to control how big ((when we read)) the bounds table ((how big that)) bounds table is ((but still you)) may end up using ((. . .))
Match %: 18.99%
Original text: A few bytes beyond a baggy bound do not cause an error, however, it is out of bounds
Matched text: ((actually going to)) cause an error ((speaking this access)) is out of bounds ((right . . .))
Match %: 12.82%
Original text: Baggy bounds ensure compatibility with the pre-existing, non-instrumented libraries
Matched text: ((how does baggy)) bounds ensure compatibility with ((these preexisting))
Match %: 28.57%
Original text: Space – for instance, when using a fat pointer, the pointers need to be bigger but when using the baggy bounds system, the bounds table should be stored
Matched text: ((So if you’re)) using a fat pointer ((But if you’re)) using the baggy bounds system ((when we read)) the bounds table ((each entry))
Match %: 17.30%
Source 2: https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-858-computer-systems-security-fall-2014/video-lectures/lecture-3-buffer-overflow-exploits-and-defenses/xSQxaie_h1o.pdf
Total matches: 11 (hide)
Original text: One does not have to instrument every pointer operation if static code analysis can be used to figure out that a particular set of pointer operations is safe (In Jajodia, 2014)
Matched text: ((because Windows basically)) does not have ((you don’t actually)) have to instrument every pointer operation if ((you can use)) static code analysis (()) to figure out ((the)) particular set of pointer operations is safe ((. . .))
Match %: 41.41%
Original text: Initializing all these bounds to 31 allows one to automatically assume that each pointer from an instrumented code is going to have the largest bound possible, 2 raised to 31 for instance
Matched text: ((to do is)) automatically assume that each pointer from ((interpose we get)) an instrumented code ((. . .)) code is going to have the largest bound possible 2 raised to ((the 31))
Match %: 43.40%
Original text: False alarms – a program generates out of bound pointers but fails to dereference it
Matched text: ((the case that)) a program generates out of bound pointers but ((it may try)) to dereference it ((it may))
Match %: 58.33%
Original text: The baggy bounds then flag the creation of the out of bounds pointers if they get beyond half a slot size, that is, if it occurs in the 32-bit solution
Matched text: The baggy bounds ((will)) flag the creation of ((can actually put)) the out of bounds pointers if they get beyond ((actually greater than)) half a slot ((this notion of)) a slot size ((at least)) in the 32-bit solution ((right . . .))
Match %: 39.34%
Original text: =====================1/3======================Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses 1 Name Course Tutor Date Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses Baggy bounds allow axises that are out of bounds, as long as they stay within the specific baggy bounds
Matched text: ((it will actually)) allow axises that are out of bounds ((if)) they stay within ((that baggy))
Match %: 18.75%
Original text: One of the causes of the failure of a program is that the baggy bounds system could throw a hard synchronous error if one gets beyond half a slot from the edge of that baggy bound
Matched text: ((close up with)) the baggy bounds system ((will actually)) throw a hard synchronous error if ((actually greater than)) half a slot ((beyond 1 2)) a slot from the edge of that baggy ((four bytes beyond)) that baggy bound ((. . .))
Match %: 31.23%
Original text: When baggy bounds initialize the bounds tables, they set all entries to be a value of 31
Matched text: ((baggy bounds initializes)) the bounds tables they set all ((this is going)) to be a ((bit tricky))
Match %: 31.34%
Original text: A high order bid is set on the pointer so as to prevent one from trying to subsequently dereference the program which will cause a hard fault at that point
Matched text: ((it’s going to)) cause a hard fault at that point ((. . .))
Match %: 15.66%
Original text: CPU overhead – it is used for doing all of the pointer instrumentation
Matched text: ((CPU overhead of)) doing all of the pointer instrumentation ((right . . .))
Match %: 40.00%
Original text: A few bytes beyond a baggy bound do not cause an error, however, it is out of bounds
Matched text: ((actually going to)) cause an error ((speaking this access)) is out of bounds ((right . . .))
Match %: 12.82%
Original text: Baggy bounds ensure compatibility with the pre-existing, non-instrumented libraries
Matched text: ((how does baggy)) bounds ensure compatibility with ((these preexisting))
Match %: 28.57%
Source 3: https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-858-computer-systems-security-fall-2014/video-lectures/lecture-3-buffer-overflow-exploits-and-defenses/xSQxaie_h1o.srt
Total matches: 9 (hide)
Original text: Initializing all these bounds to 31 allows one to automatically assume that each pointer from an instrumented code is going to have the largest bound possible, 2 raised to 31 for instance
Matched text: ((. . .)) assume that each pointer from ((861 we get)) an instrumented code ((. . .)) is going to have the largest bound possible 2 ((182 00))
Match %: 30.49%
Original text: One of the causes of the failure of a program is that the baggy bounds system could throw a hard synchronous error if one gets beyond half a slot from the edge of that baggy bound
Matched text: ((close up with)) the baggy bounds system ((44 690 actually)) throw a hard synchronous error if ((actually greater than)) half a slot ((beyond 1 2)) a slot from the edge of that baggy ((four bytes beyond)) that baggy bound ((. . .))
Match %: 29.05%
Original text: =====================1/3======================Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses 1 Name Course Tutor Date Buffer Overflow Exploits and Defenses Baggy bounds allow axises that are out of bounds, as long as they stay within the specific baggy bounds
Matched text: ((it will actually)) allow axises that are out of bounds ((52 290 if)) they stay within ((that baggy))
Match %: 17.58%
Original text: False alarms – a program generates out of bound pointers but fails to dereference it
Matched text: ((31 540 that)) a program generates out of bound pointers ((it may try)) to dereference it ((it may))
Match %: 45.83%
Original text: The baggy bounds then flag the creation of the out of bounds pointers if they get beyond half a slot size, that is, if it occurs in the 32-bit solution
Matched text: The baggy bounds ((will)) flag the creation ((can actually put)) the out of bounds pointers if they ((actually greater than)) half a slot ((this notion of)) a slot size ((at least)) in the 32-bit solution ((423 00))
Match %: 28.60%
Original text: A high order bid is set on the pointer so as to prevent one from trying to subsequently dereference the program which will cause a hard fault at that point
Matched text: ((41 770 to)) cause a hard fault at that point ((. . .))
Match %: 14.81%
Original text: One does not have to instrument every pointer operation if static code analysis can be used to figure out that a particular set of pointer operations is safe (In Jajodia, 2014)
Matched text: ((you don’t actually)) have to instrument every pointer ((you can use)) static code analysis ((58 250 the)) particular set of pointer operations is safe ((. . .))
Match %: 30.14%
Original text: A few bytes beyond a baggy bound do not cause an error, however, it is out of bounds
Matched text: ((actually going to)) cause an error ((070 this access)) is out of bounds ((right . . .))
Match %: 12.67%
Original text: When baggy bounds initialize the bounds tables, they set all entries to be a value of 31
Matched text: ((baggy bounds initializes)) the bounds tables ((. . .)) they set all ((this is going)) to be a ((bit tricky))
Match %: 16.10%
Source 4: https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1442241/Details
Total matches: 2 (hide)
Original text: 10th International Conference, DIMVA 2013, Berlin, Germany, July 18-19, 2013, proceedings
Matched text: 10th International Conference DIMVA 2013 Berlin Germany July 18-19 2013 proceedings ((Published . . .))
Match %: 99.99%
Original text: Detection of intrusions and malware, and vulnerability assessment
Matched text: Detection of intrusions and malware and vulnerability assessment ((9th International))
Match %: 99.99%
On Fri, Jul 28, 2017 at 11:16 AM, Grace Njeri wrote:
I’ve just renamed it.
ReplyForward 

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