Learning Goal: I’m working on a psychology multi-part question and need an expla

Learning Goal: I’m working on a psychology multi-part question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Week 5 Discussion: Intellectual Property Legislation and Social MediaIntellectual property legislation faces new challenges posed by social media, especially in the area of copyrights. The magnitude of Internet publishing, coupled with the potential for viral transmission of published content, means that there may be many potential risks to intellectual property rights. For example, the law prohibits the recording of live music performances and the sale of those recordings. With access to social media sites, these recordings can be shared with the masses with a click of a button. Broad access to technology increases challenges to protecting against copyright infringement.For this Discussion, select a current piece of U.S. legislation related to regulation of intellectual property. Consider how the legislation you select may be applied in a social media forum.Post by Day 4 of Week 5A description of the piece of legislation you selected. Then explain how this legislation may be applied in a social media forum. Finally, explain how social media might contribute to intellectual property theft.Respond by Day 6 of Week 5 to least two of your colleagues’ postsChoose a colleague who chose legislation different than you. Expand on his or her post by providing some additional insights on the legislation or by offering your thoughts on the legislation’s impact on identity theft.Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of reading the comments your colleagues made.Submission and Grading InformationGrading CriteriaTo access your rubric:Week 5 Discussion RubricPost by Day 4 of Week 5 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 5To Participate in this Discussion:Week 5 DiscussionWeek 5 Assignment: Intellectual Property Theft and Related Jurisdictional IssuesJurisdictional issues related to intellectual property theft, as well as issues of retribution and compensation, may create additional challenges when the theft occurs in cyberspace. Questions arise regarding where a complaint should be registered and which law enforcement agencies are responsible for responding. Due to the complexity of these matters, the federal government set up the Internet Crime Complaint Center (ICCC). The ICCC receives Internet-related criminal complaints and directs them to the appropriate federal, state, local, or international law enforcement or regulatory agency.For this assignment, review the scenario in the media “Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime: Intellectual Property.” Think about jurisdictional issues related to the intellectual property theft and which law enforcement agencies might respond to the crime. Then consider appropriate retribution for the offender and appropriate compensation and/or restitution for the victim.The AssignmentUse the Walden Library and the Internet to find research that focuses on legal regulations of intellectual property theft.Using the Walden Writing Center APA Course Paper Template, write a 3- to 5-page paper in which you do the following:Explain potential jurisdictional issues in the reporting of the intellectual property theft in the media scenario.
Explain what role, if any, local, state, and/or federal law enforcement might have in the regulation of the intellectual property theft in the media scenario.
Explain potential appropriate retribution for the offender and potential appropriate compensation and/or restitution for the victim of the intellectual property theft.
Support your Assignment with specific references to all resources used in its preparation. You are to provide a reference list for all resources, including those in the Learning Resources for this course.Submit by Day 7 of Week 5Submission and Grading InformationTo submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:Please save your Assignment using the naming convention”WK5Assgn+lastname+firstinitial.(extension)” as the name.
Click the Week 5 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
Click the Week 5 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
Next, from the Attach File area, click the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK5Assgn+lastname+firstinitial.(extension)” and click Open.
If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
Click the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading CriteriaTo access your rubric:Week 5 Assignment RubricCheck Your Assignment Draft for AuthenticityTo check your Assignment draft for authenticity:Submit your Week 5 Assignment draft and review the originality report.Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 5To submit your Assignment:Week 5 AssignmentWeek 6 Discussion: Cyber-BullyingSocial networking sites provide a virtual space where individuals can communicate with friends and meet new people. While intended for these purposes, these sites also can be harmful by making individuals vulnerable to cyber-bullying. In a virtual world, individuals can easily hide their true identities. An adult woman can pose as an adolescent boy in order to bully an adolescent girl. This was the case in the Megan Meier incident. In October 2006, Megan was a victim of cyber-bullying that occurred through a social networking site. The offender, Lori Drew, was the mother of Megan’s female friend. She cyber-bullied Megan by posing as an adolescent boy and targeting Megan’s low self-esteem, ultimately resulting in Megan committing suicide.At the time this incident occurred, there was no legislation related to cyber-bullying. Lori Drew was charged with conspiracy and unauthorized access of a computer for violating the social networking site’s Terms of Service. Drew was convicted of three misdemeanor violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. She faced up to 3 years in prison and a $300,000 fine. Drew, however, never served jail time, nor did she pay any fine. The conviction was overturned by U.S. District Judge George Wu in July 2009.For this Discussion, review the Megan Meier case and current legislation on cyber-bullying outlined in “Guarding Against a Radical Redefinition of Liability for Internet Misrepresentation: The United States v. Drew Prosecution and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.” Consider how the outcome for the offender in the case might be different if the crime were to occur today.Post by Day 4 of Week 6An explanation of how the outcome might be different for the offender in the Megan Meier case if the offense happened today. Support your response with references to current cyber-bullying legislation and/or rulings on current cyber-bullying cases.Respond by Day 6 of Week 6 to least two of your colleagues’ postsChoose a colleague who has not yet been responded to or who has few responses. Expand on his or her post by providing examples you read in the news that support whether you think recent legislation has an impact on cyberbullying. Support your stance.Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of reading the comments your colleagues made.Submission and Grading InformationGrading CriteriaTo access your rubric:Week 6 Discussion RubricPost by Day 4 of Week 6 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 6Advances in technology have increased opportunities to commit countless crimes that have lasting effects on victims. Consider the following examples:A hacker accesses a young woman’s social media account, assumes her identity, and posts a message that she has been robbed while traveling overseas and needs money immediately to return home. The young woman’s friends and family members immediately wire money to the hacker, thinking they are helping the woman.
A hacker gains access to a company’s cloud server, downloads proprietary gaming software, and sells it to other companies for millions of dollars.
A 12-year-old girl tragically ends her life after her classmates relentlessly bully her on several different social media platforms.
In this module, you will examine how criminals use technology to commit acts of identity theft, intellectual property theft, and cyber-bullying. You also will consider criminal justice efforts to combat these crimes.Learning ObjectivesAnalyze influence of hackers on sharing of personal information on the Internet
Analyze perception of hackers by the criminal justice system
Analyze how legislation is applied in social media forums
Analyze how social media contributes to intellectual property theft
Analyze jurisdictional issues in the reporting of intellectual property theft
Analyze role of law enforcement in the regulation of intellectual property theft
Evaluate appropriate retribution for offenders of intellectual property theft
Evaluate appropriate compensation and restitution for victims of intellectual property theft
Analyze cyber-bullying legislation
Learning ResourcesRequired ReadingsTaylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., Saylor, M., R. & Tafoya, W. L. (2019). Cyber crime and cyber terrorism (4th ed.). Pearson.Chapter 4, “Hackers” (pp. 77-105)
Chapter 8, “Sex Crimes, Victimization, and Obscenity” (pp. 190-238)
Chapter 11, “Law Enforcement Roles and Responses” (pp. 290-304)
Chapter 12, “The Investigation of Computer-Related Crime” (pp. 307-330)
Aleem, S. (2016). Bullying behavior among school students: A review. Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing, 7(10), 976-981.Ashiq, S., Majeed, S., & Malik, F. (2016). Psychological predictors of cyber bullying in early adulthood. Health Science Journal, 10(3), 1-9.Chapin, J. (2016). Adolescents and cyber bullying: The precaution adoption process model. Education and Information Technologies, 21(4), 719-728.Cooley, A. H. (2011). Guarding against a radical redefinition of liability for Internet misrepresentation: The United States v. Drew prosecution and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Journal of Internet Law, 14(8), 1, 15–28.Cross, C. (2017). ‘But I’ve never sent them any personal details apart from my driver’s licence number …’: Exploring seniors’ attitudes towards identity crime. Security Journal, 30(1), 74-88.Fast, A. A., Olson, K. R., & Mandel, G. N. (2016). Experimental investigations on the basis for intellectual property rights. Law and Human Behavior, 40(4), 458-476.Gupta, P., & Mata-Toledo, R. (2016). Cybercrime: In disguise crimes. Journal of Information Systems & Operations Management, 10(1), 1-10.Graves, P. E., & Sexton, R. L. (2017). Optimal public policy against identity theft. American Economist, 62(2), 217-221.Hao, J., & Dai, H. (2016). Social media content and sentiment analysis on consumer security breaches. Journal of Financial Crime, 23(4), 855-869.Kaur, M., & Kaur, I. (2016). Cyber victimization: Dark side of virtual world. Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing, 7(11), 1067-1070.Mackinnon, A., Marcum, C. D., & Higgins, G. E. (2016). Identity theft reports of adolescents. Journal of Financial Crime, 23(4), 965-973.Musharraf, S., & Anis-ul-Haque, M. (2018). Cyberbullying in different participant roles: Exploring differences in psychopathology and well-being in university students. Pakistan Journal of Medical Research, 57(1), 33-39.Safner, R. (2016). The perils of copyright regulation. Review of Austrian Economics, 29(2), 121-137.U.S. Department of Justice. (n.d.). Reporting computer, Internet-related, or intellectual property crime. Retrieved May 8, 2018, from https://www.justice.gov/criminal-ccips/reporting-computer-internet-related-or-intellectual-property-crimeYeh, B. T. (2016). Intellectual property rights violations: Federal civil remedies and criminal penalties related to copyrights, trademarks, and patents (CRS report for Congress No. RL34109). Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34109.pdfRequired MediaTechnological solutions and 21st-century crime: Intellectual propertyAn animated case study of how the Vancouver Police Department used the internet and social media to communicate with the public about important issues and riot updates. An animated case study about a gang violence in Mexico and how social media is not only a target for violence but also how it helped local authorities. An animated case study about an active shooter incident at the University of Texas in Austin and how social media helped during the incident. An animated case study about the dangers of posting. (2m)Social Media in ActionJill is an artist who is has created a painting that she hopes to sell at an upcoming art show. She posts a picture of her work in progress to her fans. One fan, Paul, likes her new work that he copies her work from the picture and presents it at the same art show. Does copying someone else’s creative work a crime regarding intellectual property? This animation video can be used as a starter for student consideration of legal issues involving intellectual property. (12m)Cyber-Surveillance (Week 7There is no private life which has not been determined by a wider public life.—George Eliot, Felix Holt, the RadicalDo you ever wonder who has access to your personal online communications? In the name of national interests, government agencies have increased their power and capabilities to monitor online activities. They have the ability to find out what keywords you have searched online, the contents of your e-mails and social media posts, your credit card purchases, and a wealth of other personal data. Whether searching for tax evaders or terrorists, government agencies continuously have new tools at their disposal to monitor the communications and activities of suspects. As these agencies respond to new and dangerous cyber-threats, are they violating personal freedoms in an effort to keep society safe?In this module, you will examine the degree to which cybersurveillance violates civil rights.Learning ObjectivesAnalyze monitoring and regulating of Internet hate sites
Evaluate whether monitoring and regulating Internet hate sites infringes upon freedom of speech
Analyze violation of civil rights from cyber-surveillance
Evaluate the use and necessity of surveillance to tackle cybercrime
Analyze the influence of surveillance on citizens’ trusts of states
Analyze challenges related to regulating privacy-enhancing technologies
Learning ResourcesRequired ReadingsTaylor, R. W., Fritsch, E. J., Saylor, M., R. & Tafoya, W. L. (2019). Cyber crime and cyber terrorism (4th ed.). Pearson.Chapter 9, “Anarchy and Hate on the World Wide Web” (pp. 246-267)
Awan, I. (2016). Islamophobia on social media: A qualitative analysis of the Facebook’s walls of hate. International Journal of Cyber Criminology, 10(1), 1-20.Balica, R. (2017). The criminalization of online hate speech: It’s complicated. Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice, 9(2), 184-190.Burnap, P., & Williams, M. L. (2016). Us and them: Identifying cyber hate on twitter across multiple protected characteristics. EPJ Data Science, 5(1), 1-15.Hanzelka, J., & Schmidt, I. (2017). Dynamics of cyber hate in social media: A comparative analysis of anti-Muslim movements in the Czech republic and Germany. International Journal of Cyber Criminology, 11(1), 143-160.Margulies, P. (2017). Global cybersecurity, surveillance, and privacy: The obama Administration’s conflicted legacy. Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies, 24(2), 459-495.Mason, G., & Czapski, N. (2017). Regulating cyber-racism. Melbourne University Law Review, 41(1), 284-340.Trottier, D. (2017). Digital vigilantism as weaponisation of visibility. Philosophy & Technology, 30(1), 55-72.Urban, J. (2018). What is the eye in the sky actually looking at and who is controlling it? An international comparative analysis on how to fill the cybersecurity and privacy gaps to strengthen existing U.S. drone laws. Federal Communications Law Journal, 70(1), 1-76.Zajko, M. (2018). Security against surveillance: IT security as resistance to pervasive surveillance. Surveillance & Society, 16(1), 39-52.International Network Against Cyber Hate. (2018). INACH. Retrieved from http://www.inach.netWeek 7 Discussion: Regulation of Internet Hate SitesA hate crime is commonly defined as “a criminal offense committed against persons, property, or society that is motivated, in whole or in part, by an offender’s bias against an individual’s or a group’s perceived race, religion, ethnic/national origin, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation” (Taylor, Fritsch, Saylor, & Tafoya, 2019, p. 247).Hate crimes are illegal, and most states have hate crime statutes that provide enhanced penalties for this type of crime. Contemporary technology allows hate to be spread farther and wider through the use of hate sites than can be done by word of mouth. These sites are accessible to anyone with a computer. While hate crimes are illegal and often carry harsh penalties, hate sites are not illegal. People and groups who launch hate sites rely on the U.S. Constitution and their right to freedom of speech as protection from the law.For this Discussion, consider whether hate sites should be monitored and regulated. Think about whether or not monitoring and regulating these sites might infringe upon freedom of speech.Post by Day 4 of Week 7An explanation of whether or not hate sites should be monitored and regulated. Then explain whether or not monitoring and regulating hate sites might infringe upon freedom of speech.Respond by Day 6 of Week 7 to least two of your colleagues’ postsChoose a colleague who has not yet been responded to or who has few responses. Expand on his or her post by offering why you agree or respectfully disagree. Support your stance.Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of reading the comments your colleagues made.Submission and Grading InformationGrading CriteriaTo access your rubric:Week 7 Discussion RubricPost by Day 4 of Week 7 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 7
Requirements: 1 page disscussion could be a bit more than half a page or 3/4 of page preferably and 3 or more pages assignment. Disscussions pref 3/4 page or 1 page   |   .doc file

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